This is my second, and much belated, entry in the ‘Keeping Alive a Tradition’ series which aims to bring to the fore any recipes which have had a particular bearing on my heritage. The first recipe, cawl, is a favourite of mine and though it is well known nationally, it remains rather unappreciated on an international scale. Welsh cakes share no such problem as they are widely available throughout the United Kingdom and probably beyond, though I have no evidence of that. Nevertheless, a series of posts dedicated to Welsh cuisine couldn’t possibly be considered credible without the inclusion of these delicious drop scones.

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Victoria Sandwich

By and large I have to admit that I’m not much of a cake man – I often find, perhaps unsurprisingly, that they are a little too cakey for my liking. By that I mean there is a little too much sponge and not enough of anything else. However, if done perfectly, a Victoria Sponge can be absolutely delightful. I think the key to making a good sponge is to use high quality eggs, because their taste really comes through in the mixture. As such, if you use bad eggs it will just taste a little dodgy – luckily we keep our own chickens, so that was covered for perfectly. Another bonus of the victoria sponge is that it’s so simple, and therefore cheap to make – it isn’t even iced. It really is the perfect British cake to be enjoyed, as Queen Victoria did, at 11 o’clock with a spot of tea.

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Welsh Cawl

Being Welsh I thought it might be a good idea to, over time, post numerous traditional recipes from my home country with the aim of making them a little more popular and keeping tradition alive. As such, the epitome of Welsh cooking, cawl, really had to come first. Cawl is actually the Welsh word for broth and as tradition dictates must contain lamb and leek. However, cawl is really a dish for using left overs, for that reason one can use nearly anything to make it, and it often includes potatoes, swede, bacon and carrots.

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