frugalfeeding | Low Budget Family Recipes, UK Food Blog http://frugalfeeding.com n. frugality; the quality of being economical with money or food. Thu, 03 Sep 2015 10:00:59 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.4 Braised Lamb Neck Ragu http://frugalfeeding.com/2015/09/03/braised-lamb-neck-ragu/ http://frugalfeeding.com/2015/09/03/braised-lamb-neck-ragu/#comments Thu, 03 Sep 2015 10:00:59 +0000 http://frugalfeeding.com/?p=8926 It’s difficult to judge the general impression people will have of a recipe with the words ‘lamb neck’ in the title. Neck. It shouldn’t sound appetising. But to me, it does. Brought up on traditional Welsh cawl, lamb neck (or scrag end) evokes memories of simple, warming stew lovingly made by either one of myContinue reading

The post Braised Lamb Neck Ragu appeared first on frugalfeeding | Low Budget Family Recipes, UK Food Blog.

]]>
Slow Cook Lamb Ragu Pappardelle

It’s difficult to judge the general impression people will have of a recipe with the words ‘lamb neck’ in the title. Neck. It shouldn’t sound appetising. But to me, it does. Brought up on traditional Welsh cawl, lamb neck (or scrag end) evokes memories of simple, warming stew lovingly made by either one of my parents. This recipe for Braised Lamb Neck Ragu, though vastly different in flavour, retains that basic feeling. It’s a joy to consume.

The internet describes scrag end as ‘the inferior end of a neck of mutton’. And while there is a difference as you progress up – or down – the neck, scrag end is anything but inferior. Middle neck is delicious, succulent even, but what it doesn’t have is that high bone to meat ratio.

Naturally, you might not think much of a high bone to meat ratio, but when you’re braising a piece of meat the rich marrow that bone brings is a great advantage. Happily, scrag end is just about the cheapest cut of lamb available. A kilo of the finest quality scrag end shouldn’t cost you much more than £6.

Neck of Lamb Recipes

Braised for at least 2 hours, ideally 4, once your lamb neck ragu is ready the meat should be falling off the bone. Succulent doesn’t seem a strong enough word to describe perfectly cooked lamb neck. The sauce, thickened by the marrow, clings willingly to the pasta and flavouring the dish uniformly throughout.

If you’re looking for a real comfort meal as we move into autumn, one that’s frugal to boot, then this braised lamb neck ragu should be firmly on your radar. And don’t be scared to pick out that chunk of scrag end from your local butcher. Regret will not be felt – my thanks, as usual, to Source (Bristol).

Of course, you may prefer your ragu with beef…

Braised Lamb Neck Ragu

Serves 6

Ingredients:

  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 2 onions, roughly chopped
  • 1 carrot, finely diced
  • 1 stick of celery, finely sliced
  • 3 cloves of garlic, mashed
  • 1kg lamb neck (scrag end)
  • 250ml red wine
  • 1 tin of chopped tomatoes
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 600g tagliatelle/pappardelle
  • parmesan to serve

Method:

  1. Preheat the oven to 170C/150C(fan). Using a large pan or deep tray suitable for the oven, sweat the onions, carrot, celery and garlic in the olive oil.
  2. Add the lamb and colour well all over. Pour over the wine and tomatoes, add the bay leaves and season generously.
  3. Cover with a lid or layer of foil and cook for at least 2 hours (4 is best). The meat is ready when falling off the bone.
  4. Once cooked, strip the meat from the bone and mix through the thickened sauce. Return to the oven.
  5. Meanwhile, bring the pasta to a boil in plenty of well-salted water. Undercook the pasta by a minute or two, drain and mix through the ragu. Serve immediately, with a little parmesan.

Braised Lamb Ragu Pasta Braised Lamb Neck Ragu Recipe

Cost: Lamb, red wine… parmesan. Lamb neck ragu doesn’t sound frugal does it? Yet, it is. Choose your wine carefully, for instance, and you can pick up a genuinely enjoyable bottle for just a few pounds.

All ingredients considered, this ragu shouldn’t set you back much more than £9, and will easily serve 6 generously. That fits within my laws of frugal.

The post Braised Lamb Neck Ragu appeared first on frugalfeeding | Low Budget Family Recipes, UK Food Blog.

]]>
http://frugalfeeding.com/2015/09/03/braised-lamb-neck-ragu/feed/ 3
Orange and Rosemary Biscotti http://frugalfeeding.com/2015/08/28/orange-and-rosemary-biscotti/ http://frugalfeeding.com/2015/08/28/orange-and-rosemary-biscotti/#comments Fri, 28 Aug 2015 10:00:11 +0000 http://frugalfeeding.com/?p=8906 There’s this little Italian coffee shop in my hometown. The coffee is superb. The food perhaps even better. But look more closely and you find a jar labelled ‘biscotti – 12p’. They’re only small. You might even want to order 4 or 5. But in biscotti lies the ability to bring forth the best fromContinue reading

The post Orange and Rosemary Biscotti appeared first on frugalfeeding | Low Budget Family Recipes, UK Food Blog.

]]>
Orange Biscotti Recipe

There’s this little Italian coffee shop in my hometown. The coffee is superb. The food perhaps even better. But look more closely and you find a jar labelled ‘biscotti – 12p’. They’re only small. You might even want to order 4 or 5. But in biscotti lies the ability to bring forth the best from a strong black coffee. Orange and Rosemary Biscotti? Perhaps even more so.

Classic biscotti, imbued with almond; they are one of my favourite “biscuits”. Twice baked for crunch and best soaked in a dark roast americano. Beautiful. But open up the possibility of changing the flavour of biscotti around and what you’re left with is a blank canvas with which to play.

Essentially flour, sugar and egg, biscotti doesn’t possess an element destructive to an flavour combination. There’s so much you can do. Be inventive. The Italian pantry is your oyster. Orange and rosemary is something of a classic combination; fragrance and citrus.

Recipe for Rosemary and Orange Biscotti

As you bite into your freshly made, particularly crisp biscotti the first flavour that reaches you is a subtle citrus orange taste. Nothing overwhelming, but just right. And as consistently as the orange fades, so comes through the fragrant rosemary, leaving its scent in your nostrils until washed away unceremoniously by a cup of filthy java. Bliss.

Making biscotti isn’t a difficult process. But it’s important not to over-bake the dough at the first stage. It wants to colour slightly and form a shell, but it needs to be soft enough to slice through without crumbling.

The second tricky part is knowing when your biscotti is done. Your little twice baked Italian biscuits needn’t be hard when they come out of the oven. But they jolly well should go hard – and hard throughout – once cool. We don’t want to break any dentures.

Orange and Rosemary Biscotti

Makes 10-12

Ingredients:

  • 100g plain flour
  • 60g golden caster sugar
  • ¼ tsp baking powder
  • a pinch of salt
  • a sprig of rosemary, finely chopped
  • the zest of 1 orange
  • 1 medium egg
  • 1 tbsp milk

Method:

  1. Grease and line a baking tray. Preheat your oven to 180C/160C(fan).
  2. Sieve the plain flour into a large mixing bowl. Add the sugar, baking powder, salt, rosemary and orange zest – mix thoroughly. Form a well in the middle.
  3. Whisk together the milk and egg and pour into the well. Using a fork, work the mixture into a soft dough.
  4. Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface, it should be very sticky. Knead it a little and form into a ball.
  5. Place your dough onto the prepared tray and form into a log roughly 9 inches in length – pat down slightly. Bake for 20-25 minutes, until hard and golden brown.
  6. Set the log aside to cool for a few minutes, before slicing diagonally into 1cm sections with a bread knife.
  7. Place the biscotti back on the tray and bake at 150C until hard and brown, remembering to turn them halfway through. This should take 15 minutes.
  8. Set aside to cool fully before eating. Best served with a strong, black coffee.

Rosemary Biscotti Recipe How to make biscotti

Cost: Perhaps the simplest of Italian desserts – If you can call biscotti a dessert – these little bites of heaven shouldn’t set you back much more than 80p.

The post Orange and Rosemary Biscotti appeared first on frugalfeeding | Low Budget Family Recipes, UK Food Blog.

]]>
http://frugalfeeding.com/2015/08/28/orange-and-rosemary-biscotti/feed/ 8
Salted Chocolate Chunk Cookies http://frugalfeeding.com/2015/08/20/salted-chocolate-chunk-cookies/ http://frugalfeeding.com/2015/08/20/salted-chocolate-chunk-cookies/#comments Thu, 20 Aug 2015 10:00:53 +0000 http://frugalfeeding.com/?p=8865 Cookies come but once a year in our house. They’re oh-so-wrong, yet oh-so-right, in the sense that they’re worse for you than pretty much anything, but consequently also taste better. Of course, scarcity demands indulgence and my Salted Chocolate Chunk Cookies are the culinary manifestation of such necessity. Everyone has a favourite approach to cookies.Continue reading

The post Salted Chocolate Chunk Cookies appeared first on frugalfeeding | Low Budget Family Recipes, UK Food Blog.

]]>
How to Make Chocolate Chunk Cookies
Cookies come but once a year in our house. They’re oh-so-wrong, yet oh-so-right, in the sense that they’re worse for you than pretty much anything, but consequently also taste better. Of course, scarcity demands indulgence and my Salted Chocolate Chunk Cookies are the culinary manifestation of such necessity.

Everyone has a favourite approach to cookies. Unlike biscuits – in the British sense – there isn’t a one size fits all approach to cookies. And perhaps that’s part of their appeal. You can, within reason, do anything you like with a cookie. Salt? No problem. Chocolate? The more the merrier.

Adding salt to ingredients like caramel and chocolate has been in vogue for a few years now. It’s strange, then, that this is the first recipe I’ve written/tried that uses the combination. But it isn’t hard to see why the saline addition is so popular.

The inclusion of those few extra crystals of high-quality salt add a dimension far beyond their worth. Drawing out an even more intense flavour – as you might expect – the salt helps to elevate these salted chocolate chunk cookies over their esteemed rivals.

Salted Chocolate Chunk Cookies

You can easily make these cookies your own too. Perhaps try substituting half the chocolate for a similar quantity of walnuts. I know that would go down very well around these parts.

To be honest, cookies have never come easily to me. These are the best I’ve ever made. But if you’d like to try something a little different, my recipes for cardamom cookies and golden oat and raisin cookies are worth a try.

Salted Chocolate Chunk Cookies

Makes 10-12

Ingredients:

  • 120g caster sugar
  • 100g light brown sugar
  • 120g butter
  • 1 egg
  • ½ tsp bicarbonate of soda
  • 175g plain flour
  • 200g dark chocolate, roughly chopped
  • a pinch of salt, plus extra for sprinkling

Method:

  1. Preheat your oven to 190C/170C(fan). In a large mixing bowl, cream together the butter and sugars.
  2. Whisk the egg into the creamed ingredients, before folding through soda, plain flour, chocolate and salt.
  3. Bring the ingredients together into a large ball. Lay a sheet of baking parchment on a tray and arrange the dough into 10-12 dollops, leaving several inches between each.
  4. Bake the cookies for 8-10 minutes until golden brown. Set aside to cool before transferring to a cooling rack. Scatter with good-quality salt crystals and enjoy while still slightly warm.

Recipe for Salted Cookies Recipe for Salted Chocolate Cookies

Cost: Despite containing an exciting amount of chocolate, these chunky cookies aren’t adorned with enough expensive ingredients to set you back an eye-watering amount.

Naturally, the more expensive the chocolate you use, the dearer your cookies will be. Personally, I see little point in using irresponsibly priced chocolate in cookies; neither too cheap, nor too expensive.

Plump for something in between and you’ll have a fine batch of delicious, pain-numbingly good salted chocolate chunk cookies sitting in front of you for as little as £2.50.

The post Salted Chocolate Chunk Cookies appeared first on frugalfeeding | Low Budget Family Recipes, UK Food Blog.

]]>
http://frugalfeeding.com/2015/08/20/salted-chocolate-chunk-cookies/feed/ 7
Madeira Cake http://frugalfeeding.com/2015/08/16/madeira-cake/ http://frugalfeeding.com/2015/08/16/madeira-cake/#comments Sun, 16 Aug 2015 10:00:37 +0000 http://frugalfeeding.com/?p=8846 Despite its name, Madeira Cake is a traditional British sponge cake. It has no connection with Portugal, except in name. In fact, it’s only gently flavoured with citrus – usually lemon – making it one of the simplest pound cakes in the repertoire. The reason I’m finally getting round to a recipe for Madeira cake?Continue reading

The post Madeira Cake appeared first on frugalfeeding | Low Budget Family Recipes, UK Food Blog.

]]>
British Madeira Cake Recipe

Despite its name, Madeira Cake is a traditional British sponge cake. It has no connection with Portugal, except in name. In fact, it’s only gently flavoured with citrus – usually lemon – making it one of the simplest pound cakes in the repertoire.

The reason I’m finally getting round to a recipe for Madeira cake? The Great British Bake Off. For those of you not in the UK, this is a baking competition held in a tent in the middle of an undisclosed British field. The cake this week? You guessed it. Madeira cake. If you’ve ever made a sponge cake, learning how to make Madeira cake couldn’t be easier. The only real difference is the addition of lemon zest, a slightly higher proportion of flour and a longer cooking time.

How To Make Madeira Cake

These differences, however small, give rise to a closer texture and the cake’s signature crack along the top. Without a crack, it’s not a Madeira cake. But follow the recipe and the crack will come.

Personally, I wouldn’t try and do anything fancy with a Madeira cake. It’s simplicity is what makes it great. Having said that, feel free to flavour it with whatever citrus fruit takes your fancy. The addition of ground almonds also works well, yielding a more complex flavour and lighter texture.

For more easy cake ideas, see my recipes for Honey Cake, Caraway Seed Cake and Blackcurrant and Mascarpone Victoria Sponge.

Madeira Cake

Makes a 2lb loaf cake

Ingredients:

  • 175g butter, softened
  • 175g caster sugar
  • 3 eggs
  • zest of 1 lemon
  • 225g self-raising flour
  • extra lemon rind for decoration

Method:

  1. Preheat your oven 170C/150C(fan). Grease and line a 2lb loaf tin.
  2. Cream together the butter and sugar in a large bowl. Beat in the eggs one by one, until you have a uniform batter.
  3. Gently fold through the lemon zest and flour. Once everything has just about come together, pour the mixture into the prepared loaf tin.
  4. Bake for 55-60 minutes, or until golden brown and cooked through. Leave to stand for 10 minutes before turning out.
  5. Set aside to cool completely before decorating and serving.

Traditional Madeira Cake Recipe Recipe for Madeira Cake

Cost: As a simple sponge cake, Madeira cake is one of the most frugal bakes. It’s delicious, without requiring anything fancy. No icing. Nothing. Consequently, you can easily bake this traditional British cake yourself for a mere £2.

The post Madeira Cake appeared first on frugalfeeding | Low Budget Family Recipes, UK Food Blog.

]]>
http://frugalfeeding.com/2015/08/16/madeira-cake/feed/ 4
Bircher Muesli http://frugalfeeding.com/2015/07/21/bircher-muesli/ http://frugalfeeding.com/2015/07/21/bircher-muesli/#comments Tue, 21 Jul 2015 10:00:44 +0000 http://frugalfeeding.com/?p=8820 Bircher muesli this; Bircher muesli that. It seems that if you neglect to start each day with a bowl of overnight oats, then something’s awry – such is the popularity of Bircher muesli. But with breakfast preeminence comes a hefty price tag. The solution? A recipe for Homemade Bircher Muesli. Despite its current status asContinue reading

The post Bircher Muesli appeared first on frugalfeeding | Low Budget Family Recipes, UK Food Blog.

]]>
What Is Bircher Muesli

Bircher muesli this; Bircher muesli that. It seems that if you neglect to start each day with a bowl of overnight oats, then something’s awry – such is the popularity of Bircher muesli. But with breakfast preeminence comes a hefty price tag. The solution? A recipe for Homemade Bircher Muesli.

Despite its current status as the in-vogue breakfast of the masses, the roots of Bircher muesli first began to take hold at the very beginning of the 20th Century. Invented by Swiss nutritionist, Maximilian Oskar Bircher-Brennar, this was the original rendition of the iconic cereal.

It seems strange that a breakfast designed for use in a Swiss sanitorium should become so popular over a century later. But Bircher’s faith in raw vegetables and fruits certainly rings true, now more than ever.

Bircher Muesli Recipe

That Bircher muesli is so ineffably popular in supermarkets is somewhat surprising. It’s a breakfast that demands being made the evening before consumption. You’d assume more people would be willing to spend the required 10 minutes cobbling it together. The result of homemade Bircher muesli is cheaper and more delicious; the power of convenience never ceases to amaze me.

But what is Bircher muesli if, as claimed, it is different from what we’d now define as “standard” muesli? The original recipe is far simpler than the one found below. And a little less appetising, at least in appearance.

It was essentially a mush of grated apple accompanied by a respectable ratio of oats, condensed milk, lemon juice and nuts. The creation of a physician obsessed with the restorative powers of raw vegetables and fruits. But on to the making!

Bircher Muesli

Serves 4

Ingredients:

  • 50g porridge oats
  • 10g each of jumbo oats, barley flakes & rye flakes
  • 20g plump raisins
  • 5g each of pumpkin seeds & sunflower seeds
  • 5ml lemon juice
  • 200ml whole milk
  • 40ml apple juice
  • 2 tbsp Greek yoghurt
  • 30g chopped walnuts
  • 1 large apple, grated
  • 40g dried mixed fruit, whatever you like
  • 50g raspberries

Method:

  1. In a large bowl mix together the oats, flakes, raisins, seeds, lemon juice, milk and apple juice. Cover and leave overnight in the fridge.
  2. Before serving, stir through the yoghurt, walnuts, grated apple, dried mixed fruit and 40g of the raspberries. Serve with the remaining raspberries.

Recipe for Bircher Muesli How To Make Bircher Muesli

Cost: This isn’t a basic Bircher muesli recipe – things can get a lot more bare bones than what you see before you. Despite that, four portions shouldn’t set you back much more than £1.65. Quite possibly less.

To give that some context, pots of Bircher muesli can often retail for upwards of £1.75. That means you can make your own for less than a quarter of the price. And yours will have beautifully ripe British raspberries.

The post Bircher Muesli appeared first on frugalfeeding | Low Budget Family Recipes, UK Food Blog.

]]>
http://frugalfeeding.com/2015/07/21/bircher-muesli/feed/ 1
Tomato and Olive Salsa http://frugalfeeding.com/2015/07/16/tomato-and-olive-salsa/ http://frugalfeeding.com/2015/07/16/tomato-and-olive-salsa/#comments Thu, 16 Jul 2015 10:00:07 +0000 http://frugalfeeding.com/?p=8808 One of our favourite ways to eat during the summer months is very much in the Spanish style of tapas. Though not always Spanish in origin, the food that fills our table at this time of year is varied and plentiful. And of course, every spread of tapas must feature a salsa; this recipe forContinue reading

The post Tomato and Olive Salsa appeared first on frugalfeeding | Low Budget Family Recipes, UK Food Blog.

]]>
How To Make Tomato and Olive SalsaOne of our favourite ways to eat during the summer months is very much in the Spanish style of tapas. Though not always Spanish in origin, the food that fills our table at this time of year is varied and plentiful. And of course, every spread of tapas must feature a salsa; this recipe for Tomato and Olive Salsa is one of our favourites. There’s a salsa out there for everyone; mango, for instance, makes for a light, refreshing salsa. But this recipe is on the other end of the spectrum entirely. And, while it’s still light, the heavy dose of olive oil and sliced olives gives the dish a punchy flavour.

Recipe for Tomato and Olive Salsa

It’s that firm-flavoured characteristic that means it pairs well with simply flavoured main courses and starters. It would, for instance, accompany a fillet or two of pan-fried mackerel spectacularly. Feeling a little flush and fancy a treat? Little better would help bring that rare rump steak alive. But remember; a little meat goes a long way.

If you’re going to make the most of this salsa, don’t hold back on the flavourings. Extra virgin olive oil may be relatively expensive, but generous glugs here and there can be so much more effective than a timid drizzle. And if there’s one thing worse than splashing out a little, then it’s probably wasting good food.

Tomato and Olive Salsa

Serves 3-4

Ingredients:

  • A small handful of kalamata olives, finely chopped
  • 1 chilli, finely sliced
  • 2 spring onions, finely sliced
  • 3 tbsp olive oil
  • a generous pinch of salt
  • a twist of black pepper
  • 300g cherry tomatoes, quartered

Method:

  1. Thoroughly mix together the olives, chilli, spring onions, olive oil and seasonings in a large bowl.
  2. Gently fold through the tomatoes, ensuring full coverage and serves.

Tomato and Olive Salsa Recipe How To Make Tomato and Olive Salsa

Cost: British tomatoes this time of year are remarkably cheap (and remarkably delicious). At 75p for a 300g punnet at my local grocers, it’s difficult not to cram my face full of them at every opportunity.

Of course, the secondary benefit of such cheap tomatoes is an inexpensive tomato and olive salsa; it shouldn’t set you back much more than £1.50.

The post Tomato and Olive Salsa appeared first on frugalfeeding | Low Budget Family Recipes, UK Food Blog.

]]>
http://frugalfeeding.com/2015/07/16/tomato-and-olive-salsa/feed/ 3
Homemade Muesli http://frugalfeeding.com/2015/07/08/homemade-muesli/ http://frugalfeeding.com/2015/07/08/homemade-muesli/#comments Wed, 08 Jul 2015 10:00:21 +0000 http://frugalfeeding.com/?p=8796 Not something I indulged in for many years, muesli has in recent months made itself a permanent fixture of my mornings. Muesli can certainly be described as one of the healthy breakfasts, easy to separate from most sugar-laden cereals. But some ingredients in commercial muesli can be sneaky and coming up with a Homemade MuesliContinue reading

The post Homemade Muesli appeared first on frugalfeeding | Low Budget Family Recipes, UK Food Blog.

]]>
Recipe for Homemade Muesli

Not something I indulged in for many years, muesli has in recent months made itself a permanent fixture of my mornings. Muesli can certainly be described as one of the healthy breakfasts, easy to separate from most sugar-laden cereals. But some ingredients in commercial muesli can be sneaky and coming up with a Homemade Muesli Recipe can give you back control.

The issue is that many commercial mueslis contain artificially sweetened ingredients. Companies, therefore, don’t need to list sugar as an ingredient. Sweetened ingredients include banana chips, papaya, pineapple and dates. Make your own homemade muesli and this compulsion by large companies to sweeten even healthy breakfasts can be sidestepped.

Healthy Muesli Recipe

But making a truly healthy muesli recipe wasn’t simply an exercise in taking back some control, it was a test to see if homemade muesli can be thrown together for a reasonable price. It can!

Containing many of the same ingredients as commercial muesli – barley flakes and rye flakes – this recipe for homemade muesli comes in at roughly the same price as the offerings of cheaper brands. Though ‘basics’ muesli isn’t taken into account in that reckoning because it’s essentially overpriced porridge oats. Harsh? Perhaps. But a breakfast has to be top notch if it’s going to set you up for the day.

Is Muesli Healthy

The difference? The muesli featured here uses a ‘luxury’ mix of dried fruits – cranberries, golden raisins – in addition to organic oats and flakes. If you were to make use of dried fruits even more cleverly, I’m sure you could reduce the price further still. Personally, the slightly inflated spend is more than worth it for the quality of the breakfast involved.

Naturally, there’s another glaring benefit of producing your own homemade muesli; choice. You can choose exactly what you’d like to go into your muesli. Sunflower seeds? Not a problem. Sesame seeds? Easy!

Healthy Breakfasts

It gives you a freedom of choice that you could only dream of at the supermarket checkout. Take back control of breakfast; make your own, homemade muesli!

Homemade Muesli

Makes 650g (12 servings)

Ingredients:

  • 100g porridge oats
  • 100g jumbo oats
  • 50g rye flakes
  • 50g barley flakes
  • 100g mixed fruit
  • 100g sultanas
  • 50g flaked almonds
  • 50g sunflower seeds
  • 25g sesame seeds
  • 25g walnuts

Method:

  1. Take a big bowl and mix everything together thoroughly. Serve as you like it.

Homemade Muesli Recipe Healthy Breakfast Ideas

Cost: As mentioned above, the cost of this homemade muesli is roughly equivalent to the cheapest ‘luxury’ commercial mueslis. At £1.70 for 650g you’ll soon be mixing your own for good.

The post Homemade Muesli appeared first on frugalfeeding | Low Budget Family Recipes, UK Food Blog.

]]>
http://frugalfeeding.com/2015/07/08/homemade-muesli/feed/ 15
Sausage and Butterbean Pasta Bake http://frugalfeeding.com/2015/07/06/sausage-and-butterbean-pasta-bake/ http://frugalfeeding.com/2015/07/06/sausage-and-butterbean-pasta-bake/#comments Mon, 06 Jul 2015 10:00:47 +0000 http://frugalfeeding.com/?p=8791 With Britain having just experienced its hottest July day on record, it’s safe to say that now is the time for cold soups, salads and healthy portions of ice cream. But that doesn’t mean to say that comfort dishes are out the window completely. You might not fancy a heavy beef stew, but a SausageContinue reading

The post Sausage and Butterbean Pasta Bake appeared first on frugalfeeding | Low Budget Family Recipes, UK Food Blog.

]]>
Summer Pasta Bake Recipe
With Britain having just experienced its hottest July day on record, it’s safe to say that now is the time for cold soups, salads and healthy portions of ice cream. But that doesn’t mean to say that comfort dishes are out the window completely. You might not fancy a heavy beef stew, but a Sausage and Butterbean Pasta Bake might just hit the spot.

I think we all remember the pasta bakes of our youth. Simple dishes, thrown together by busy mums after a hard day at work/school. They were, of course, delicious. But my sausage and butterbean pasta bake is a recipe with a difference.

Sausage and Butterbean Pasta Bake
Flavoured not with a questionable mix of ‘Italian herbs’, but with fragrant bay leaves and fennel, it’s nice to take a different approach to the classic pasta bake. The fennel, in particular, complements the pork sausages beautifully; the combination is, after all, well-known.

In fact, if you wanted to use a pork and fennel sausage for the bake, perhaps with a little apple thrown in for added sweetness, that would work beautifully. The more flavour you pack into a pasta bake, the better it’ll be. You could even experiment; a spicy lamb sausage would, for instance, add another dimension.

Recipe for Sausage Pasta Bake

If this bake doesn’t take your fancy, but you’d like a delicious pasta dish to try, check out my recipes for Spicy Chorizo and Tomato Pastaa, and Tagliatelle Primavera. You could even try your hand at making your own gnocchi…

Sausage and Butterbean Pasta Bake

Serves 6

Ingredients:

  • 600g pasta, penne preferable
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 onion, finely sliced
  • 3 cloves of garlic, mashed
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 1 tsp fennel seeds, ground
  • 400g tin of chopped tomatoes
  • 500g carton of passata
  • 8 pork sausages
  • 400g tin of butterbeans, drained
  • salt to taste
  • 100g cheddar cheese, grated

Method:

  1. Gently fry the onion and garlic in the olive oil. Once softened, add the bay leaves, ground fennel seeds, chopped tomatoes and passata. Pop the lid on and set aside to simmer.
  2. Brown the sausages in a heavy-based frying pan and set aside. Put the pasta on to boil in plenty of generously salted water.
  3. Chop each sausage into 3-4 pieces and add to the sauce, along with the butterbeans. Season to taste.
  4. Drain the pasta once cooked and allow to sit for a few minutes. Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 200C/180C(fan).
  5. Transfer the pasta to a large oven dish and stir through the prepared sauce. Top with the grated cheddar and bake until golden brown. Serve immediately, or cold the next day.

Sausage Pasta Bake Recipe How To Make Pasta Bake
Cost: Recipes for pasta bake are generally known for their frugality and comforting nature. This rendition is no different.

Despite being easily enough to feed six, it shouldn’t set you back much more than £5. Less than £1 per portion; not bad for a giant portion of comfort.

The post Sausage and Butterbean Pasta Bake appeared first on frugalfeeding | Low Budget Family Recipes, UK Food Blog.

]]>
http://frugalfeeding.com/2015/07/06/sausage-and-butterbean-pasta-bake/feed/ 4
Rhubarb Compote Flapjacks http://frugalfeeding.com/2015/07/01/rhubarb-compote-flapjacks/ http://frugalfeeding.com/2015/07/01/rhubarb-compote-flapjacks/#comments Wed, 01 Jul 2015 10:00:36 +0000 http://frugalfeeding.com/?p=8784 Flapjacks. I’m always looking for a different approach to them. An unadulterated flapjack, though delicious in all its buttery glory looks to me like a blank canvas, ready for painting with all manner of flavours. This recipe for Rhubarb Compote Flapjacks represents something new in my repertoire; a flapjack with a layer of preserve runningContinue reading

The post Rhubarb Compote Flapjacks appeared first on frugalfeeding | Low Budget Family Recipes, UK Food Blog.

]]>
Recipe for Rhubarb Flapjacks

Flapjacks. I’m always looking for a different approach to them. An unadulterated flapjack, though delicious in all its buttery glory looks to me like a blank canvas, ready for painting with all manner of flavours. This recipe for Rhubarb Compote Flapjacks represents something new in my repertoire; a flapjack with a layer of preserve running through the centre. Irresistible.

Bake these and you’ll realise that they’re old-school flapjacks with a twist. Soft, buttery and sweet; they contain oats, but even that’s not enough to convince you that they’re doing any good at all. In health terms at least. Though if it’s a healthy snack you’re after, there is a better place to look…

Recipe for Rhubarb Compote Flapjacks

The layer of rhubarb compote running through the centre – made using a recipe published here a few years ago – only adds to the feeling of decadence. The sharpness of the rhubarb, no longer the sweet forced variety, contrast beautifully with the fruitiness of the strawberries and citrus of the orange.

The result is a flapjack with a little something extra that elevates them from simple snack to divine dessert. Generously spoon a hearty helping of extra compote over the finished article and you’ll certainly not be met with a single complaint.

Compote Flapjack Recipe

If chocolate is more your thing, you might like to try my recipes for Chocolate and Hazelnut Flapjacks or Double Chocolate Flapjacks…

Rhubarb Compote Flapjacks

Makes 14-16 squares

Ingredients:

  • 200g butter, salted
  • 50g granulated sugar
  • 50g light brown sugar
  • 4 tbsp golden syrup
  • 400g jumbo oats (porridge oats are fine)
  • 4 tbsp rhubarb compote

Method:

  1. Grease and line a square cake tin roughly 30cmx30cm and preheat the oven to 160C/180C(fan). Melt together the butter, sugars and syrup in a pan.
  2. Once the butter and sugars have melted and dissolved, mix through the oats until fully incorporated. Everything should be covered.
  3. Press half the mixture into the prepared tin. Spread over the compote, leaving a border of around 2cm all around.
  4. Spoon over the remaining oats and press flat, gently encouraging it to the corners and ensuring the filling is fully covered.
  5. Bake for 20-25 minutes until golden brown. Set aside to cool, before turning out and cutting into squares.

Rhubarb Flapjacks Recipe How to Make Rhubarb Flapjacks

Cost: Without the layer of compote, these flapjacks would be super inexpensive. Under £1.50. But I think the addition is worth it; the flavour it gives is a worthy investment. Compote included, these flapjacks should set you back no more than £2.60.

The post Rhubarb Compote Flapjacks appeared first on frugalfeeding | Low Budget Family Recipes, UK Food Blog.

]]>
http://frugalfeeding.com/2015/07/01/rhubarb-compote-flapjacks/feed/ 11
Béchamel Gnocchi Bake http://frugalfeeding.com/2015/06/29/bechamel-gnocchi-bake/ http://frugalfeeding.com/2015/06/29/bechamel-gnocchi-bake/#comments Mon, 29 Jun 2015 10:00:22 +0000 http://frugalfeeding.com/?p=8778 Béchamel sauce is, perhaps, one of the most comforting. It, therefore, seemed only right that it was the sauce chosen to envelope my beautifully light, but heartwarming pillows of homemade gnocchi. My recipe for Béchamel Gnocchi Bake must be one of the most satisfying of my collection. As you spoon it into your bowl, itContinue reading

The post Béchamel Gnocchi Bake appeared first on frugalfeeding | Low Budget Family Recipes, UK Food Blog.

]]>
Recipe for Baked Gnocchi

Béchamel sauce is, perhaps, one of the most comforting. It, therefore, seemed only right that it was the sauce chosen to envelope my beautifully light, but heartwarming pillows of homemade gnocchi. My recipe for Béchamel Gnocchi Bake must be one of the most satisfying of my collection. As you spoon it into your bowl, it almost demands that take just one more – you greedy thing.

Though signifying a clash of cuisines – French and Italian – it seems that béchamel sauce and gnocchi were made for one another. Béchamel gnocchi bake is a simple dish; maybe even one of the simplest. But the rich white sauce, combined with the flavoursome and pleasantly textured potato “pasta” makes for pure temptation. It’s a cathartic experience.

Baked Gnocchi Recipe

As with my recipes for macaroni cheese and cauliflower cheese, the béchamel in this bake is infused with several layers of flavour. Though unadulterated béchamel is divine, infusing it with a few extras – bay leaves, cloves, peppercorns – takes things to the next level. Perhaps even the one after that.

How you serve this bake is up to you. Personally? A bowl of this with nothing else is my idea of heaven. Spoonful after spoonful of creamy, comforting bliss. Though, while I’m not one to advocate the use of expensive meat, a few strips of rare rump steak would go down a treat. And maybe even a gulp or two of beer. But let’s not stray too far from the frugal track.

Béchamel Gnocchi Bake

Serves 3-4

Ingredients:

  • 568ml whole milk (1 pint)
  • 3-4 peppercorns
  • 2 cloves
  • 3 bay leaves
  • a pinch of freshly grated nutmeg
  • 50g plain flour
  • 50g salted butter
  • ¼ tsp English mustard
  • 1 batch of homemade gnocchi
  • 75g mature cheddar cheese, grated
  • olive oil and pepper, to serve

Method:

  1. Bring the milk, bay leaves, cloves, peppercorns and nutmeg to a simmer. Remove from the heat and set aside (lid on) to infuse for at least 15 minutes (1 hour is best).
  2. Meanwhile, bring a pan of salted water to the boil and cook your gnocchi. The gnocchi are ready when they float to the surface. Drain and set aside. Preheat the oven to 200C/180C(fan).
  3. Strain your infused milk. Melt the butter in a large pan and beat in the flour until you have a thick roux.
  4. Bit by bit whisk the strained milk into the roux. Bring to a simmer and add the mustard. Cook until thick enough to generously coat the back of a spoon.
  5. Transfer the gnocchi into a large casserole dish. Pour over the béchamel, ensuring everything is coated well. Cover with the grated cheese and bake until golden brown.
  6. Serve immediately with a drizzle of olive oil and a twist of black pepper.

How To Make Baked Gnocchi Bechamel Baked Gnocchi Recipe

Cost: As we’ve seen, the batch of gnocchi used here shouldn’t set you back much more than £1. Add to that the remaining ingredients, and what you have is a hearty meal for under £2.50.

The post Béchamel Gnocchi Bake appeared first on frugalfeeding | Low Budget Family Recipes, UK Food Blog.

]]>
http://frugalfeeding.com/2015/06/29/bechamel-gnocchi-bake/feed/ 18