Florentines

Dried Fruit Florentines

As their name suggests, Florentines are an Italian “biscuit” that originally hail from Florence, Tuscany. In their most basic form they are essentially a group of nut and cherries set in caramel and coated on one side with dark chocolate. However, as with most concepts, there are a million-and-one variations on the classic (check out Wuthering Bites’ sterling recipe). As you can see, these are a little less fancy than her’s – mine are strictly flower free – though they remain mightily delicious. Though I must admit that the infamous Katherine should take full credit for these biscuits – she made them!

As you may have deduced, these are only biscuits by virtue of their shape – really, they’re more like a sweet (or dare I say it… candy). This is no bad thing, of course – Florentines may be a long shot from my traditionally British Christmas spiced biscuits, but I’m sure the biscuit community would be glad to keep them on board. Strangely enough, though Florentines are great for lighter weather, this particular recipe approaches the festive – perfect, considering the unseasonably cold weather we’re experiencing. After all, nothing engenders a festive spirit quite like chocolate and plump dried fruit! With that in mine, I bid you all a very jolly Easter – don’t go making yourselves sick with dangerous amounts of chocolate.

Florentines

Makes 8-12

Ingredients:

• 60g blanched almonds, roughly chopped

• 25g mixed peel

• 25g raisins

• 25g sultanas

• 25g dried cranberries

• 25g glace cherries

• 35g plain flour

• 75g butter

• 75g golden syrup

• 100g dark chocolate

Method:

1. Preheat the oven to 180C and line a tray with baking parchment. Melt together the butter and golden syrup. Remove from the heat, stir in the fruit and sift in the flour. Stir thoroughly.

Dried Fruit Florentines

2. Spoon the mixture onto the sheet in 1 tbsp dollops, flatten a little bit around 1 inch apart. Pop in the oven for 8-10 minutes, until golden brown.

3. Allow to cool on parchment for 5-10 minutes until rigid, then remove to cool completely on a wire rack. Melt the chocolate in a bowl suspended over simmering water, coat the bottom of each Florentine. Leave to set chocolate side up before indulging.

Dried Fruit Florentines

Cost: The entire batch of delicious Florentines, which also happen to be perfect for Easter, come in at a mere £2 – beat that!

51 thoughts on “Florentines

  1. narf77

    YUM! I can feel the calories seeping down to my hips and that is just from looking at them! I have to go now…can’t afford the calories that are just about to rearrange themselves on my other bits!

  2. amintiridinbucatarie

    These little wonders are an invite for fun cooking and play, I find them very pretty and I think they also taste good. Thank you for stopping by on my blog, I hope you’ll enjoy my Facebook page, as I have a riddle game each evening.
    Kind regards, Oana :)

  3. Laurie

    It is always interesting to see how many variations there are on the same “dish”. These don’t look at all like my Florentines and yet they are obviously variations of the same delicious cookie/candy. I enjoyed the post!

  4. foods for the soul

    If only I could convince my mother that these biscuits counted as breakfast food… Although we both love chocolate so much, it might not be that hard after all! I really like all of the colors in your florentines — so bright and cheerful!

  5. Musing Mar

    These look like gem-encrusted broaches, but I’m glad they’re edible! I really should turn my hand to making Florentines; they sound so versatile and bring elegance to the dessert tray.

  6. AM

    When it comes to applying the chocolate, you say “coat the bottom”. But what is your technique? Do you paint it on with a brush, or dip the bottom in the bowl of melted chocolate? My florentines came out pretty thin-edged, so when I hold them to skim the top of the chocolate, I dip my fingertips too. And I can’t pick up the next one with chocolatey fingers, so I have to wash my hands (or at least wipe the melted chocolate off) after every single one.
    (If the florentines were just for me, I would have no qualms about licking my fingers between dippings!)

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