Simple White Bread

White Bread

One finds oneself, these days, getting rather sick of all the factory produced bread that litters every supermarket and corner shop in this country. Although it is possible to buy good bread from such places, such loaves tend to be a little on the expensive side. In stark contrast, this loaf is exceptionally good, contains no preservatives and costs next to nothing. It merely requires a little time, but even the effect of this can be lessened by making the dough in advance.

The recipe below may look a little long and complex, but I assure you that isn’t the case, so why not give it a go! If you don’t have a few hours to spare in a single day, make the dough the night before and then put in the fridge to rise. This slows the rising process, and means the dough will be ready the next day just in time for baking. Otherwise, this loaf will take roughly three hours to make and bake: one hour is required to let it rise; another to let it prove. You can see the size of it for yourself, suffice to say it’s fairly large.


  • 500g strong white flour, plus extra for dusting
  • 7g yeast
  • generous amount of salt
  • 3 tbsp olive oil
  • 300ml warm water
Mix together the flour, yeast and salt in a large mixing bowl. Make a small well in the centre and pour in the oil and water. Mix thoroughly until you have a malleable, but not too sticky ball of dough.
Knead on a lightly floured surface until very smooth, this may take up to five minutes or so.
Place the dough in an oiled bowl and cover with a tea towel, leave to rise, in a moderately warm place, for about an hour. In this time it should roughly double in size.
Knock the dough back, so it returns to roughly its original size. Line the baking tray with parchment and leave to prove for another hour.
Five minutes before the proofing process is over pre-heat the oven to 200C. Slice the top of the bread into a lattice and dust with flour. Bake for 25 – 30 minutes.
Leave to cool for a little while before eating, otherwise it might be a little doughy.
Around 40-50p for the entire loaf. Better an cheaper than anything you’ll get in a supermarket.
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22 comments on “Simple White Bread

  1. Britt
    April 22, 2011 at 5:14 pm

    A very handy tip for bargain bread baking is that if you ask the bakery staff at Tesco supermarkets for fresh yeast they give it to you for free!

    • frugalfeeding
      April 22, 2011 at 5:46 pm

      How did you find that out?! Unfortunately I don’t shop at Tesco…

  2. veggiegrettie
    April 22, 2011 at 9:29 pm

    There is something so welcoming about the smell of fresh baked bread…

    • frugalfeeding
      April 23, 2011 at 8:59 pm

      One of the reasons I love living above a bakery!

  3. safifer
    November 9, 2011 at 5:57 pm

    Good fresh bread has to be one of the most wonderful things to eat. I’ve been doing the wet dough that I can keep in the fridge all the time.

    • frugalfeeding
      November 9, 2011 at 6:39 pm

      I totally agree, it’s so delicious. That’s a good idea!

  4. sourdoughtheangrybaker
    December 3, 2011 at 3:38 pm

    That’s a beautiful take on simple white bread, prettier than the usual pain de mie baked in a pullman loaf pan. Nice work Frugal!

    • frugalfeeding
      December 10, 2011 at 3:20 pm

      Thanks! I adore baking bread, but haven’t had much time recently.

  5. Cressida Gaukroger
    May 7, 2012 at 9:44 pm

    I just made this and it has turned out wonderfully! Thanks for the recipe!

    • frugalfeeding
      May 24, 2012 at 10:35 pm

      Awesome. I’m so glad you liked it. I adore a good white bread.

  6. Misky
    October 28, 2012 at 10:47 pm

    Do you think I could use a standmixer for the mixing and kneading? I have a dicky wrist at the moment, and I really want to try this recipe.

  7. Wade
    February 15, 2013 at 7:14 am

    Just made this bread and for some reason it’s still white on the outside. Not at all like the golden brown crust shown in your pictures. It’s my first time making bread so I was curious if I may have done something wrong or if it’s just because of the flour I used, etc?

    • frugalfeeding
      February 24, 2013 at 8:20 pm

      I can’t think of any reason, was the oven hot enough? Try adding a little shallow tray of water to the bottom of your oven, the steam helps build a good crust.

  8. Nerdator
    December 13, 2013 at 11:33 pm

    The recipe is great, I’m seriously thinking of not buying bread ever again (and also trying more complicated things). :)

    One piece of advice from my own mistakes: ‘warm water’ means about room temperature warm. Make sure it’s not hotter than body temperature — or the flour will be clumping when you mix it with water, and completely destroy your bread’s texture.

    The water actually can be cold — it won’t affect the result, just increase the time it takes for the dough to become warm enough to start rising.

  9. Emma
    March 3, 2014 at 9:38 pm

    How can I turn this recipe into a wholemeal loaf?

    Love your website!

    • frugalfeeding
      March 4, 2014 at 8:55 am

      I guess, just use wholemeal flour, or half and half. You’ll likely need a little extra water for that and wholemeal can be much harder to work with.

  10. chefconnie
    June 9, 2015 at 3:32 pm

    Great bread recipe.. I am going to try to make this with Einkorn today. I am also trying a no knead with einkorn flower. I am intrigued by this ancient wheat and how it does not see to be problem for most gluten free people. Einkorn is not an inexpensive ingredient but in my family we treat refined wheat like meat as a very small part of our diet.

    • frugalfeeding
      June 11, 2015 at 10:58 am

      I’ve never worked with Einkorn – I hope it works out. Let me know what you think!

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